Research
Written by Jennifer Brown
Storage has never been the sexiest part of a surveillance deployment, but it’s increasingly become the most important and potentially the most costly. Customers are sitting up and taking notice, especially as green initiatives become part of the equation.
Written by Steve Bocking
The benefits of IP video surveillance are fairly obvious for higher education institutions such as colleges and universities, since typically the security system resides over many buildings, often with a centralized control room.
Written by Staff
According to a new report on the Americas market for security systems integration, IMS Research has found that integrators are increasing their RMR (Recurring Monthly Revenue) through service and maintenance contracts. IMS Research forecasts that service and maintenance will account for 33.4 per cent of the total Americas security systems integration market by 2014. 
Written by Jennifer Brown
Technologies such as mass notification, thermal cameras, video analytics and edge/distributed recording are just a few areas in the security industry that have been slow to come to maturity but are now taking off and will be trends to watch for next year.
Written by Neil Sutton
According to a report released this week by IMS Research, more than half of network IP cameras sold around the world will be HD or megapixel resolution in the next four years.
Written by Staff
The world market for perimeter security sensors is projected to exceed $440 million by 2014. The growth of this market will primarily be driven by proposed legislation in Europe, CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear plants), CFATS in the U.S. and airport and nuclear power plant expansion across Asia.  
Written by Staff
Video analytics and other "enabling technologies" can reduce per-camera costs for leading companies, according to a report included in the latest Quarterly Research Update from the Security Industry Assocation (SIA).
Written by Staff
The latest report from IMS Research, “The World Market for CCTV and Video Surveillance Equipment – 2010 Edition” forecasts that the world demand for surveillance equipment will recover  in 2010, growing by over nine per cent compared to 2009.  
Written by Jennifer Brown
In a market dominated by a major competitor, Virgil Reed is trying to carve out a niche for his business, Reed Security, in Saskatoon, offering clients the latest technology to solve their problems and keep his own business moving forward. While analogue still dominates his client base, Reed is introducing them to the benefits of HD video, going so far as to call it “Reed HD.” His showroom has been set up to demo ACTi, Arecont and Hunt megapixel cameras, with Arecont for HD and cameras tied into a Nuuo mini NVR.
Written by Robert Moore
Surveillance cameras historically had one basic physical limitation: they needed light to work. It’s true that some cameras have night and day functionality that allows them to operate in very poor lighting conditions, even down to fractions of a lux. And of course, if natural light is not available you can install electrical lighting, either visible to the human eye or infrared. But these solutions can have serious drawbacks.
Written by Steve Bocking
IP video surveillance has brought forth lots of new options for integrators to offer their clients enhanced security, such as distributed video monitoring, the improved image quality of megapixel/HD and the integration of video analytics.   But what has become even more interesting with these new digital systems is the opportunity for security integrators to sell the same products in different non-security applications — for example, sharing security cameras for monitoring non-security applications, teleconferencing and remote teaching/learning purposes.
Written by Jennifer Brown
While IP video continues to take market share from analogue cameras the industry’s rapid growth rate has slowed to between five and eight per cent over the last 18 months — about half of previous estimates, according to those who watch the security industry, but customers are seeing the benefits and asking for the technology more than ever. Speaking at the Securing New Ground conference in New York Nov. 11, market analyst Jeff Kessler said the majority of the integrators out there are going to be busy revamping older analogue systems, installing new DVR or networked systems and integrating analytics software to help security professionals make decisions in real time. That statement seems to be true according to Canadian consultants and integrators who spoke with SP&T News. “The swing started last spring,” says Terry Hoffman of Hoffman & Company a consulting firm based north of Toronto. “It has been slow with the challenging economy but there is no doubt that IP video products will be the favourable product of choice when considering new and retrofitted video management systems in 2010.” Hoffman says he is currently working on 11 CCTV projects and four are large IP- based designs utilizing new and/or existing fibre ring for a dedicated security network. The other seven systems are new install, low budget jobs with fewer than 20 cameras. An important message to deliver to end-users and integrators says Hoffman is the length of the planning cycle required and “true” full compatibility around software and control equipment in monitoring video.  “For example, municipalities and large clients that are in the middle of a migration plan and looking at the capital requirements should think about this as not all facilities or retails stores can be completed all at once. There is a lot to consider. Full migration involves encoders, software and disk space. I have two large clients that I am working on a strategic plan for to change operations from analogue to IP across CCTV and access control,” says Hoffman. While analogue remains less expensive to upgrade and to install and does not require more IT-savvy integrators who know how manage network technologies, Kessler noted in his annual report on the industry that “the functionality, scalability and longer-term total cost of ownership, and ultimately ROI, of IP video may very well be superior.” “We are still installing analogue but the scale has dramatically tipped towards IP over the past year,” says Carlo Di Leo, general manager of Double Vision based in Richmond Hill, Ont. The company specializes in consulting, designing, and integrating IP-based access control and video surveillance systems. “We make sure to educate our customers before providing any quotes and we find that the ones who take the time to listen and evaluate the information, usually end up choosing IP. I would say that 80 per cent of our business is IP (versus 50 per cent a year ago),” says Di Leo. The MMM Group handles large security system integration projects for customers such as airports and Toronto’s Union Station. For a company like MMM Group, pure analogue video projects are rare these days, but hybrid systems are still being created as organizations make the transition. “When it comes to just the camera, I have one airport that is currently installing analogue cameras and connecting them to IP encoders. This is a new installation that was planned to have this type of topology from the beginning. The design was done approximately one year ago and at that time was considered a standard configuration if not leading edge,” says Kevin Parisien, project manager, security & IT systems group with MMM Group in Toronto.   Since that time, Parisien says most manufactures have been promoting, and clients have been requesting, a complete IP system. In other words, IP right to the camera — no more encoders.   “I feel encoders are starting to become a component used for migration only. A component that allows legacy systems (analogue cameras) to attached to the new IP platform.  Unless there is a specific requirement for analogue, all of my system designs are IP and slowly migrating into the HD or Megapixel realm,” he says. Kessler’s report indicated gross margins in the IP camera business are in the mid-50 per cent range, as more functionality and flexibility versus legacy systems increase IP’s share of the overall video market.
Written by Jennifer Brown
The security industry continues to weather the economic storm and is in some cases prospering despite tough times, but one major player says a real recovery may not happen until mid-to-late 2010.
Written by Rosie Lombardi
Building intelligence technology that merges security and environmental systems with IT networks is coming. This will allow buildings to operate as unified machines instead of a hodge-podge of uncommunicative sub-systems.
Written by Neil Sutton
The global economy has taken a serious stumble, but the security business may have a decent chance of being able to stay on its feet, according to one industry leader.
Written by Elliott Goldstein
New video surveillance guidelines, endorsed by the Privacy Commissioners of Canada, Alberta, and British Columbia, were released in early March 2008. These long-awaited guidelines give private sector organizations (e.g., retailers, apartment buildings, commercial offices, companies) much needed guidance and assistance regarding “how companies should evaluate the use of video surveillance and ensure the surveillance they undertake is conducted in a way that respects privacy rights and complies with the law.” (News Release “Privacy Commissioners Release New Video Surveillance Guidelines” (March 6, 2008), found at www.priv.com.gc.ca/media.)
Written by Jennifer Brown
Major security trends for the next five years will include video surveillance, identification and biometrics, background checks and physical security services, according to a leading financial analyst following the security industry.
Page 5 of 5

Events

ISC West
April 10-12, 2019
Security Canada East
April 24, 2019
ADI Expo
May 7, 2019

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.