Opinion

The Canadian Security Association (CANASA) has undertaken a number of recent initiatives to provide the security industry with much-needed educational resources. These include:
If a verified response program has not already been implemented by your local police service, then you had best start preparing your staff, clients and the general public you serve.
CANASA staff and I have been exploring tools and strategies to help members approach social media.Ideally, we are looking for a professionally recognized method that can be customized to suit diverse businesses and their unique needs.
This year we proudly welcome a new Executive Director, association executive and publishing veteran J. David Ritter.
Education, training, sourcing and retaining qualified professionals continues to be one of the biggest challenge for security companies in this competitive industry.
It has been another productive and memorable year for the Canadian Security Association.
The earliest digital communicators were independent of the alarm panel and reported as few as three signals. However, as alarm products, and especially alarm panels, have evolved, manufacturers have added features galore.
For more than a decade, the Security Industry Alarm Coalition (SIAC) has developed many close and worthwhile relationships with law enforcement agencies.
According to Stan Martin, executive director of SIAC, “You can’t have a meaningful discussion on dispatch reduction without addressing the use of ECV.” The development of enhanced call verification (ECV) was the result of a specific request by the International Association of Chief’s of Police (IACP) Private Sector Liaison Committee (PSLC).
There can be no discussion of alarm reduction without recognizing that a small percentage of all alarm users create the vast majority of all false alarms and false dispatches. Yes, there is a difference between the two.
In the coming posts, this column will serve to educate you on the issues of false alarms and false dispatch reduction.
The residential burglar alarm sector still represents a great opportunity for security dealers but it has to be approached the right way.
I am often asked by prospective clients, what does a broker actually do? Is it necessary to use a broker to sell your business? How does using a broker help and finally what do they cost?
Many of these points have been mentioned in previous columns but perhaps they need mentioning again.
Most owners don’t know very much about the various methods of valuing companies, which is completely understandable because the methods are a profession in itself.
Over the last three years, I have had the opportunity to examine two sets of two companies, each set of which is located in the same geographical area of the country and offers the same security services.
In my last column, I talked about buying alarm accounts from a buyer’s perspective. This time I will address some issues to be aware of if you want to buy an integration business.
Video surveillance is inherently controversial.
The video surveillance industry has enjoyed fast growth and revolutionary new technology over the last decade.
Video surveillance has gone through an enormous transformation over the last decade.
Lighting is arguably the greatest challenge for any surveillance camera.
With competition in the video surveillance constantly heating up and projects often being awarded to those who offer the best price, many integrators are struggling to squeeze out the margin they need to survive.
Maintaining a video surveillance system is no different that maintaining any other network infrastructure.
The security business spans many different branches.
Growing a business requires more than hard work; it requires thinking about new business opportunities and leveraging what you already have in place to produce a positive outcome.
Fire prevention and detection for the home are very important. Every year in Canada there are around 24,000 house fires that lead to an estimated 377 deaths and 3,048 injuries. Homeowners, landlords and tenants should all be aware as this number is climbing each year. To keep families safe in the event of a fire they should look to invest in a fire prevention and detection system. This way families can be immediately alerted of any potential fires in order to reduce the risk of death and damage.  
Is your organization ready for the changes to come?
Like many of you, I find myself reading a number of articles related to our industry.
Patrick Straw is a familiar face to many in the Canadian security industry — more so now that he has joined the Canadian Security Association (CANASA) as its new executive director.
Prior to joining CANASA in February, J. David Ritter was president and CEO of the Canadian Jewellers Association. He is also the former publisher of SP&T News and has worked with previous owner CLB Media as executive vice-president. (SP&T News and other CLB Media assets were acquired by Annex Business Media in 2010.) SP&T recently conducted an email interview with Ritter to discuss his approach to association management and plans for CANASA in his new leadership role.
SP&T News recently connected with Hikvision’s North American president Jeffrey He for an email interview and asked for an update on its current market strategy and plans for Canada.
In many ways, Robert Mowles is a classic example of basement to boardroom: an entrepreneur who started a business in his own home, and through hard work and determination, made it a flourish. He has expanded his business several times and is about to move into a new 7,000 sq.-ft. facility in the Oshawa, Ont., area. But Mowles is also part of a movement in security that has seen DIY and dealer models begin to coincide and overlap. SP&T News recently spoke to Mowles about how home security is changing and how dealers and installers may ultimately benefit.
As the current president of CSAA International and CEO of Vector Security, Pam Petrow is almost uniquely qualified to talk about the current state of monitoring. Case in point, the CSAA has recognized that the industry is evolving, acknowledging that even the term “central station” may have lost its usefulness. The organization is in the midst of its own transition that will likely see it adopt a new name later this year — one that better reflects what is going on in the industry and one that should have more resonance with the end user. SP&T News spoke with Petrow recently about the proposed change for the 66-year-old organization, plus the rollout of ASAP to PSAP in the U.S. and when we may see the technology come to Canada.
Rob Martens spends a lot of time thinking about the possible — even the probable. Martens was with Ingersoll Rand for 11 years in various capacities — mostly on the IT side, he says — and left shortly before the company spun off its security business and called it Allegion. He took a CIO role with another firm, then briefly retired before being wooed back to Allegion with “an offer I couldn’t refuse.” Now, as Allegion’s futurist, he identifies trends, posits outcomes, and determines strategy accordingly. He has an abiding interest in the Internet of Things and home automation, both of which are game-changers for security. It’s up to Martens to not only identify the new rules but predict the outcome.

Events

Anixter Showcase
October 27, 2017
Anixter Showcase
November 22, 2017